Programmed longevity, youthspan, and juventology – lifespans and Healthspan

Volter Longo has some interesting new ideas regarding how we look at life expectancy, lifespan. He recommends thinking about spans in terms of youthspan (peak health 20-60) and Healthspan (oriented to disease free stage and the older phase (65-120).

check – Longo VD. Programmed longevity, youthspan, and juventology. Aging Cell. 2019;18:e12843. https://doi.org/10.1111/acel.12843 

also check David Sinclair’s new book Lifespan: Why We Age―and Why We Don’t Have To — is a really great book! Highly recommended …. packed with information … some should be taken with a grain of salt or maybe with a Sirtuin activator like NMN 🙂

 

 

Parabiosis, Reprogramming, and Diet

Live longer … think “Epigenetic Diet”.

Pay attention to “The Aging Epigenome” – paper by Lauren  Booth  and Anne Brunet (over at the  Glenn Laboratories for the Biology of Aging, Stanford U).

also pay attention to Brian J. Morris, Bradley J. Willcox, Timothy A. Donlon , Genetic and epigenetic regulation of human aging and longevity. Bbadis (2018), doi:10.1016/ j.bbadis.2018.08.039

Get familiar with Sirtuins,   resveratrol,   spermidine,  metformin, selenium,  learn to enjoy  green tea, broccoli sprouts and soybean products.

OK … exercise definitely helps!

 

 

 

 

 

Nutrition, Diet, Health, Medicine

Continuing on the reference. building … interesting insights emerging.  Lots of fad diets, some kernels of truth, lots of confusion, lots of marketing. lots to sort out. Somewhere along the development,  the connection between inputs and outcomes will become much clearer. Especially if one really isn’t in the huckstering business.

Some sources to consider:

Agatston, A. (2005). The South Beach diet: The delicious, doctor-designed, foolproof plan for fast and healthy weight loss. New York: St. Martin’s Griffin.
Atkins, R. C. (2002). Dr. Atkins’ new diet revolution. New York: M. Evans.
Bijlefeld, M., & Zoumbaris, S. K. (2015). Encyclopedia of diet fads: Understanding science and society (Second edition). Santa Barbara, California: Greenwood, an imprint of ABC-CLIO, LLC.

Bullmore, E. T. (2019). The inflamed mind: A radical new approach to depression (First U.S. edition). New York: Picador.

CRUMPTON, M. J., & DEDMAN, J. R. (1990). Protein terminology tangle. Nature, 345(6272), 212–212. https://doi.org/10.1038/345212a0

Cummings, J. H., & Stephen, A. M. (2007). Carbohydrate terminology and classification. European Journal Of Clinical Nutrition, 61, S5.

DiNicolantonio, J., & Mercola, J. (2018). Super fuel: Ketogenic keys to unlock the secrets of good fats, bad fats, and great health (1st edition). Carlsbad, California: Hay House Inc.

Freeman, J. M., & Freeman, J. M. (Eds.). (2007). The ketogenic diet: A treatment for children and others with epilepsy (4th ed). New York: Demos : Distributed to the trade by Publishers Group West.

Gioffre, D., & Ripa, K. (2018). Get off your acid: 7 steps in 7 days to lose weight, fight inflammation and reclaim your health and energy (First edition). New York, NY: Da Capo.

Goff, S. L., Foody, J. M., Inzucchi, S., Katz, D., Mayne, S. T., & Krumholz, H. M. (2006). BRIEF REPORT: Nutrition and weight loss information in a popular diet book: is it fact, fiction, or something in between? Journal of General Internal Medicine, 21(7), 769–774. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1525-1497.2006.00501.x

Gudzune, K. A., Doshi, R. S., Mehta, A. K., Chaudhry, Z. W., Jacobs, D. K., Vakil, R. M., … Clark, J. M. (2015). Efficacy of Commercial Weight-Loss Programs: An Updated Systematic Review. Annals of Internal Medicine, 162(7), 501. https://doi.org/10.7326/M14-2238

Ouzounis, C. A., Coulson, R. M. R., Enright, A. J., Kunin, V., & Pereira-Leal, J. B. (2003). Classification schemes for protein structure and function. Nature Reviews Genetics, 4(7), 508–519. https://doi.org/10.1038/nrg1113

Pritikin, N., & MacGrady, P. M. (1979). The Pritikin program for diet and exercise. New York: Grosset & Dunlap.

Rahfeld, P., Sim, L., Moon, H., Constantinescu, I., Morgan-Lang, C., Hallam, S. J., … Withers, S. G. (2019). An enzymatic pathway in the human gut microbiome that converts A to universal O type blood. Nature Microbiology. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41564-019-0469-7

Want to avoid lung cancer?

Listen. … Just don’t smoke to start with … No one can guarantee what happens … but, if you smoke you triple your risk over people who never smoked …

Framingham Heart Study researchers find that former smokers who quit smoking 25 or more years ago still have three times as much risk of developing lung cancer compared to people who have never smoked.

from the Framingham Heart Study highlights

The Mediterranean Diet and Nutritional Adequacy: A Review.

Castro-Quezada, I., Román-Viñas, B., & Serra-Majem, L. (2014). The Mediterranean Diet and Nutritional Adequacy: A Review. Nutrients.

Interesting … the claims

The Mediterranean dietary pattern, through a healthy profile of fat intake, low proportion of carbohydrate, low glycemic index, high content of dietary fiber, antioxidant compounds, and anti-inflammatory effects, reduces the risk of certain pathologies, such as cancer or Cardiovascular Disease (CVD).

The inclusion of foods typical of the Mediterranean diet and greater adherence to this healthy pattern was related to a better nutrient profile, both in children and adults, with a lower prevalence of individuals showing inadequate intakes of micronutrients.

We’ll be reviewing this and related studies in the overall evaluation …

later …

 

Mediterranean diet and telomere length

Looking at

 

Conclusion In this large study, greater adherence to the Mediterranean diet was associated with longer telomeres. These results further support the benefits of adherence to the Mediterranean diet for promoting health and longevity.”

So,  that seems promising … the question….. can you ‘stick with the diet’?  Of course, there are other studies that provide other results.  How does one resolve the discrepancies?

Stat tuned … Ideas coming soon 🙂

 

in the meanwhile some people like these dish ideas

 

Watson for Oncology (WFO) – more details

Back to Watson for Oncology (WFO). … so today was deep dive day to look at what papers were written specifically re WFO.

So,  on Sunday, June 23, 2019, using Google Scholar … the list below is of  the main useful things I could find.

Conclusions:

  • Shows promise
  • Not ready for solo flight (i.e. needs clinicians to work with it).
  • Benefits from adding diagnostic tests liken GEA (Gene expression assays)
  • Keep working on improving WFO, and understand specifics better.

 

Literature I looked at, will look at it again in more detail, and provide further insights.

  1. Choi, Y. I., Chung, J. W., Kim, K. O., Kwon, K. A., Kim, Y. J., Park, D. K., … & Sung, K. H. (2019). Concordance Rate between Clinicians and Watson for Oncology among Patients with Advanced Gastric Cancer: Early, Real-World Experience in Korea. Canadian Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, 2019.
  2. Kim, Y. Y., Oh, S. J., Chun, Y. S., Lee, W. K., & Park, H. K. (2018). Gene expression assay and Watson for Oncology for optimization of treatment in ER-positive, HER2-negative breast cancer. PloS one, 13(7), e0200100.
  3. Schmidt, C. (2017). MD Anderson breaks with IBM Watson, raising questions about artificial intelligence in oncology. JNCI: Journal of the National Cancer Institute, 109(5).
  4. Zhang, X. C., Zhou, N., Zhang, C. T., Lv, H. Y., Li, T. J., Zhu, J. J., … & Liu, G. (2017). 544P Concordance study between IBM Watson for Oncology (WFO) and clinical practice for breast and lung cancer patients in China. Annals of Oncology, 28(suppl_10), mdx678-001.
  5. Zou, F., Liu, C. Y., Liu, X. H., Tang, Y. F., Ma, J. A., & Hu, C. H. (2018). Concordance Study between IBM Watson for Oncology and Real Clinical Practice for Cervical Cancer Patients in China: A Retrospective Analysis. Available at SSRN 3287513.
  6. Somashekhar, S. P., Sepúlveda, M. J., Puglielli, S., Norden, A. D., Shortliffe, E. H., Rohit Kumar, C., … & Ramya, Y. (2018). Watson for Oncology and breast cancer treatment recommendations: agreement with an expert multidisciplinary tumor board. Annals of Oncology, 29(2), 418-423.
  7. Somashekhar, S. P., Sepúlveda, M. J., Norden, A. D., Rauthan, A., Arun, K., Patil, P., … & Kumar, R. C. (2017). Early experience with IBM Watson for Oncology (WFO) cognitive computing system for lung and colorectal cancer treatment.
  8. Somashekhar, S. P., Kumarc, R., Rauthan, A., Arun, K. R., Patil, P., & Ramya, Y. E. (2017). Abstract S6-07: Double blinded validation study to assess performance of IBM artificial intelligence platform, Watson for oncology in comparison with Manipal multidisciplinary tumour board–First study of 638 breast cancer cases.
  9. Liu, C., Liu, X., Wu, F., Xie, M., Feng, Y., & Hu, C. (2018). Using artificial intelligence (Watson for oncology) for treatment recommendations amongst Chinese patients with lung cancer: Feasibility study. Journal of medical Internet research, 20(9), e11087.
  10. Ross, C., & Swetlitz, I. (2017). IBM pitched its Watson supercomputer as a revolution in cancer care. It’s nowhere close. STAT News.
  11. Zauderer, M. G., Gucalp, A., Epstein, A. S., Seidman, A. D., Caroline, A., Granovsky, S., … & Petri, J. (2014). Piloting IBM Watson Oncology within Memorial Sloan Kettering’s regional network.
  12. Herath, D. H., Wilson-Ing, D., Ramos, E., & Morstyn, G. (2016). Assessing the natural language processing capabilities of IBM Watson for oncology using real Australian lung cancer cases.
  13. Bach, P., Zauderer, M. G., Gucalp, A., Epstein, A. S., Norton, L., Seidman, A. D., … & Keesing, J. (2013). Beyond Jeopardy!: Harnessing IBM’s Watson to improve oncology decision making.
  14. Kris, M. G., Gucalp, A., Epstein, A. S., Seidman, A. D., Fu, J., Keesing, J., … & Setnes, M. (2015). Assessing the performance of Watson for oncology, a decision support system, using actual contemporary clinical cases.